Crimson Rosellas

Crimson Rosellas are not very common in South East Queensland. We see them a couple of times a year. In ACT they seem to be as common as cockatoos are in Brisbane. The locals paid no attention to these magnificent birds.

Crimson Rosella Portrait
Crimson Rosella Portrait
Crimson Rosella Eats a Flower
Crimson Rosella Eats a Flower
Crimson Rosella Eats Another Flower
Crimson Rosella Eats Another Flower
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Ibis in Flight

Ibises are magnificent birds. They fly with power and grace. We see them every day – they thrive in cities. Largely omnivourous, highly fecund and with group breeding behaviours they do well around humans. That’s why they are known as ‘Bin Chickens.”

For large birds, they are fly a lot. We don’t photograph them as often as we should, because we see them airborne so often. As large birds with relatively slow flight they are very easy to capture in flight. Perhaps so easy we ignore them.

Behold the magnificent Bin Chicken (Threskiornis molucca) in flight.

Ibis in Flight
Ibis in Flight
Ibis in Flight
Gaining Altitude
Ibis in Flight
Deploy Feet for Landing
Ibis Landing in Tree
Almost There…
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Birds.

It’s been pissing down this week. We’ve had torrential tropical downpours with local flooding, cliffs collapsing and the river rising. It has constrained the photography somewhat.

Nevertheless, birds:

Baby Bush Turkey
Baby Bush Turkey
Bush Turkey finds a Thing
Bush Turkey finds a Thing
A young noisy miner dangles from a branch
Spoonbill Catches a Fish
Spoonbill Catches a Fish
A Young Australian Raven
A Young Australian Raven
Little Black Cormorant in Flight
Little Black Cormorant in Flight
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Mostly Birds

A grab-bag of birds and other assorted wildlife. It’s summer, and I think several of these are this year’s babies.

Royal Spoonbill
Royal Spoonbill
Magpie Lark
Magpie Lark
Young Magpie Lark
Young Magpie Lark
Dragonfly on Lily
Dragonfly on Lily
Blue-Faced Honeyeater
Blue-Faced Honeyeater
Blue-Faced Honeyeater
Blue-Faced Honeyeater
Young Blue-Faced Honeyeater
Young Blue-Faced Honeyeater. Their faces are green until they reach maturity.
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Auckland, Devonport, More Seagulls

Day Two of the Epic New Zealand Adventure started with bacon, because jet lag (yes, I know it’s only a three-hour difference but you have to get up really, really early. It hurts.) Suitably restored we strolled down to the ferry terminal and completely screwed up our timing. Left with 30 minutes to wait before our ferry we went looking for seagulls. We didn’t have to look very hard.

Pacific Gull
Looking for a Landing Spot

On the ferry for the 10-minute trip to Devonport I managed to elbow my way to the rail to grab this shot of an America’s Cup yacht hammering to windward under reefed main in a strong breeze. They cram about 20 guests on these amazing boats. It doesn’t look much fun.

America's Cup Boat
America’s Cup boat. Not sure which campaign she’s from.
Auckland
Auckland, viewed from Devonport

There’s a lovely walk along the windy Devonport shoreline where you can see lots of seagulls. Look, I warned you about this. Seagulls are awesome and I will photograph them and post the pictures here and you can’t actually stop me.

Gull over Rocks
Gull low over volcanic rocks

You’ll see that the rocks a are luscious deep volcanic black. That’s because Auckland is built in a somewhat dormant volcanic caldera. The Maori have legends about the last major eruption, over 600 years ago. If the same thing happened now it would blow out several suburbs. It will happen again. Auckland government have an entire set of management and evacuation plans for various scales of volcanic catastrophe, up to a complete permanent abandonment of the largest city in the country. More likely we’ll lose a suburb or two every few centuries, which is pretty good odds really. Anyway. More seabirds.

Pacific Gull
Same gull, different rocks

Now for something completely different. A Herring. No! Sorry. Belay that. Not a herring. A Heron.

Heron
Heron over Rocks

And now, an Oystercatcher. This is a Variable Oystercatcher, so named because different individuals have different frontal colouring. This one is completely black.

Oystercatcher
Oystercatcher, Catching some Quality Snooze rather than Quality Oysters.

With that, we pottered back across the harbour and caught a flight to Christchurch.

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